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Value Creation Blog

If You’re In A Good Mood You’ll Do Better Work

Posted by Josh Patrick

describe the imageI know this sounds like a pretty obvious statement, but is this something you’ve ever thought about?  When I first read it in Thinking Fast and Thinking Slow by Daniel Kahnerman I wanted to hit my head and just say, “Duh.” 

I wanted to know why I hadn’t spent time making sure I was in a good mood when I did work.  I know there are times when I’m annoyed and I might as well do myself and those around me a favor and just go take a walk.

Do you notice when you’re in a good mood?

Unfortunately, I usually don’t.  If I did I would enjoy the moment more.  When I’m in a good mood I am more productive.  It would be even more enjoyable if I noticed I was in a good mood and be thankful for what the moment.

What about you, do you notice when you’re in a good mood?  Do you take a moment to say thanks whens someone does something nice for you?  My bet is that if we said thank-you we would learn how to put ourselves in a good mood more easily.

When you’re in a good mood whatever you’re working on will just flow.

I know this is true for me.  When I’m in a good mood I’m really productive.  I’ll get several hours work done in 45 minutes.  Not only will I get more work done, the quality will be much higher than work I do when I’m not in a great mood.

I think that we should learn what puts us in a good mood and make sure we spend time getting ourselves in that positive state before we start a difficult project.  We’ll be more productive and hard work might just become fun.

When you’re in a bad mood, you’re more likely to make mistakes.

This is something I think I’ve finally learned.  When I’m in a rotten mood, I now spend time finding ways for me to improve my mood.  I’ll go for a walk, I’ll listen to some great music, or spend a little time reading something I enjoy.  When I do this whatever has been bothering me will fade and allow me to focus on what I need to do.

When I don’t take time to change my mental state I always pay for it.  My work will be done poorly and I’ll just have to re-do it.  Do you notice that when you’re in a rotten mood your work suffers?  If so, what do you plan to do about it?

For me it’s important that I notice

I’ve learned that I need to notice what’s going on with me.  If I’m in a great mood, I need to take advantage of that mood and tackle my most difficult project.  If I’m just OK, then I need to work on some mindless activities.  If my mood stinks, then I need to call a timeout and do a little attitude adjustment work.  When I follow those rules I win and those around me are happier.

I think this is a lesson we want to share with those who work with us.  Are you willing to have a conversation about what it takes for those we work with to be happy?  I bet the risk you’ll take to have this conversation will get you cool results.

We have a case study we’ve done on relationships and roles in your business.  This report will help you think about how you spend time in your company.  It might help you think about what you could change to get better personal results.  To get this report, click on the button below.

Click Here To Get Your Case StudyOn Relationship and Roles

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Topics: cultural change, lessons learned, personal value

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