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Value Creation Blog

What’s Your Red Velvet Rope Policy

Posted by Josh Patrick

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Have you ever tried to get into a nightclub that had a rope out front? The rope was there to only let in the people who the club owner wanted to let in.

You might have been really frustrated because you were on the outside looking in. You also might have gotten past that rope and once inside you realized that you were part of a club that was perfect for you.

I’m not saying you need a red velvet rope to be a snob, I’m saying you need it to make sure the right people join your tribe.

What do you mean by red velvet rope

A red velvet rope is not meant to make your organization one that's not accessible. It’s there so you know who you should and want to do business with.

When you tell me that everyone is part of your target market I know that you don’t have anyone in your target market. There is no way you can possibly provide great service to everyone. You have to be very clear about whom you’re meant to serve.

Here’s what you need to do

I want you to start by doing the following things:

Ask yourself who are the clients that you just love to see?

Write down their names.

Ask yourself what specifically makes these people so much fun and satisfying to work with?

Make sure you write down the answer to the above question.

Look at your entire book of customers or clients and rate all of them on a scale of one to ten with ten being the best match for your description.

Think about finding a better home for anyone that doesn’t rate at least a 7 or higher on your list.

Now you’re on your way towards defining who a great client for your organization is. When you only serve A or A+ clients three things are going to happen:

First, you’re going to become very efficient at what you do.

Second, you’re going to enjoy your work more than you ever thought you could.

Third, you’re going to see your profits soar.

All of this happens because you’ve really focused on the customers and clients you should serve. These are the people you can add the most value and have the most fun serving.

It’s time to think about who you serve

I want you to get really serious about this. If you don’t like the group of people you do business with I can promise you they know this. If you don’t like someone, how can you possibly bring your best ideas and energy to the table?

Instead, think about this: When you serve the people you’re meant to serve you’re going to have tons of fun and actually make some real money. Doesn’t this sound better than trying to be all things to all people?

What are you doing to delight those who you let through?

This is where you might want to start asking questions. You might think you know what your best customers want. I think the only way you’re really going to know what they want is by asking.  After all, if you don’t ask, how are you really going to know?

It’s truly important that you find a way to let your tribe know that you value and understand them. You want those customers you love talking about you and recommend you to others just like them. The best way to do this is to develop products and ideas that don’t make their life a little better, but massively better.

Is this something you’re willing to do?

At the end of the day you want to enjoy what you do.

For me, this is the really big take away. I know that when I only do business with those I like and those I can add massive value for I’m a much happier person. Work doesn’t feel like work. I feel like I’m doing things I would do for free.

Do you feel burned out, worn down and tired of what you’re doing? If so, I can almost promise you that it’s because you’re working with the wrong people.

Do yourself a favor. Put together a red velvet rope policy in your company. You’ll be glad you did.

Send me an email with your thoughts.  I really like to hear what your thinking about.

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Topics: Customer Service

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